Is knowing the difference between colors a skill?



  • I think there is an effect that isn’t directly related to colour, its the brains ability to track multiple targets. How many independent objects a person can track you might call a skill.

    When one player is running its easy enough to distinguish the team, the problem is when there are several players mobbed together, like what happens in team objective maps. Having two distinct team colours made it possible to instantly distinguish who is who without having to focus your attention to any one player. Now with multiple colours I find that easier to mistakenly identify someone in a crowd of swarming players, and also to keep track of whats going. This is much worse depending on lighting, health, fire etc….

    Now I am going to guess (only a guess) that object tracking becomes harder if there are multiple colours involved. You might have it straight within your head which colours are which team, but suppose you turn to view a group of 8 players fighting, I would think it takes longer for your brain to work out whats going on if there are more than 2 colours.



  • the colors get you sometimes in the game when you’re running around target switching, i can see that totally. If sidewinder doesn’t have a problem then fine. i haven’t had MUCH issue, but i’ve teamkilled a couple folks just out of confusion in the heat of battle. Sure if you’re just trotting along… and not fighitng anyone, you should be able to tell who is your team and who isn’t, but there are some discrepancies with some of the colors and sometimes it gets a little confusing. It also really depends on what map you are on… the dark blues look black sometimes which can be seen as a mason by some, the fact that green is a color option for mason doesn’t make sense to me, i got thrown off a few times and chased a green-ish archer, then i saw his helmet and felt stupid… etc, etc…



  • @clayton-bigsby:

    the colors get you sometimes in the game when you’re running around target switching, i can see that totally. If sidewinder doesn’t have a problem then fine. i haven’t had MUCH issue, but i’ve teamkilled a couple folks just out of confusion in the heat of battle. Sure if you’re just trotting along… and not fighitng anyone, you should be able to tell who is your team and who isn’t, but there are some discrepancies with some of the colors and sometimes it gets a little confusing. It also really depends on what map you are on… the dark blues look black sometimes which can be seen as a mason by some, the fact that green is a color option for mason doesn’t make sense to me, i got thrown off a few times and chased a green-ish archer, then i saw his helmet and felt stupid… etc, etc…

    Do you think this is something that would improve with time?



  • As i understand it colour identification is something that can improve with practice (anecdote: grandfather was a painter, had insane colour matching and mixing abilities), so slips roughly into a working definition of ‘skill’ which has some expression in ability to distinguish targets. I’m also aware of a few cross cultural visual cue studies which suggested people from certain cultures interpreted colours differently (e.g dimmer colour’s relationship with perception of distance), which is not so much skill as upbringing and unconscious perception. This argument can very easily get bogged in semantics.

    No, I would not agree that every human being has equal ability to recognise and distinguish colour, that’s a pretty difficult point to support. I think what you’re getting at Sidewinder is that individual differences in the ability to recognise and distinguish colour should not be enough on its own to complete jeopardise friend/foe distinctions in the game, as some people are arguing.



  • I think what everyone’s misunderstanding here is the relative property of color. That is to say- we perceive a color based on what’s around it. It’s why a lot of times painters begin a painting by first ridding themselves of the white canvas for a mid-tone- it helps them better judge their color/value relationships much more accurately than doing so against a white canvas (as white is the highest end of the value spectrum you can achieve, all colors 50% black and lower on the value scale will look much darker than they should etc.)

    This example works well with what I’m about to describe. If you have a dark blue coat with white trim and a black coat with white trim, most of the time they’re going to look the same, or at least the player will require more time to pause and determine what color he/she is seeing. However if you had two guys from each team with those respective colors standing next to each other you would be able to determine the difference in a heartbeat. This works for the other off colors (browns and golds) of the other teams as well, especially when you factor in the MaA vest is still ALWAYS brown.

    I’m also completely and totally screwed when it comes to guys who have been burned by flame, or doused in oil now. I think my brain can’t handle it :).



  • Human vision is incredibly complex. It is very… shortsighted of you to say that people who are now experiencing difficulty telling teams apart are deficient in any way. Perhaps the people who do not now experience any difficulties were previously relying more on silhouette and helmet designs than other people, who learned to play the game relying only on color cues. This is not a conscious effort, it’s just a thing that happens while you are getting used to the game. There was no reason to NOT entirely rely on the obvious color cues until now. In fact someone who had color blindness of some degree and was thus more used to shape-based object identification in general would probably not have been affected as much.



  • @Sidewinder:

    Do you think this is something that would improve with time?

    yeah most likely, i think the fact that before there was a clear distinction between colors for team based games, to now having to double take or stare at someone for a second before knowing whether to attack or help them is key. Before you knew exactly what team they were based on color, and now you have to adjust by taking a second and making sure he’s not a teammate. In group fights where you’re comboing around or target switching, it CAN get a bit confusing at times. Time will tell i suppose, i’m liking the customization though… gold helms look really good for agatha. Men at arms are perhaps my favorite with gold helm.



  • It’s really hard to tell who is who now from a distance since mason has red and black. Black looks blue from far away especially with fog. All other gripes will fade away as people get used to them. The catapult will suffer the most :(. But I’m all for a archer nerf :).



  • So no one knows the answer to why some people don’t have a problem with customization at all?

    Maybe it has something to do with the in-game settings, screen’s gamma, etc. or resolution? I have no problem to see what’s black and what’s dark blue, yet there are people who claim they have… Personally I don’t think it’s the colors: they clearly have problems to realize what model of a class I have. It can’t be just color-problem.



  • im having trouble in a full server identifying teammates and enemies



  • @dudeface:

    Human vision is incredibly complex. It is very… shortsighted of you to say that people who are now experiencing difficulty telling teams apart are deficient in any way. Perhaps the people who do not now experience any difficulties were previously relying more on silhouette and helmet designs than other people, who learned to play the game relying only on color cues. This is not a conscious effort, it’s just a thing that happens while you are getting used to the game. There was no reason to NOT entirely rely on the obvious color cues until now. In fact someone who had color blindness of some degree and was thus more used to shape-based object identification in general would probably not have been affected as much.

    That’s a really interesting insight. Sounds very plausible.



  • @Sidewinder:

    So no one knows the answer to why some people don’t have a problem with customization at all? I truly don’t and I have to assume it is a basic human function.

    It depends on what queues people were using to distinguish between mason and agatha prior to the customisation patch.

    If people used only one queue and based team distinction purely on colour then those people may have some trouble in some instances.
    I think it would be unusual for people to distinguish team mates by only 1 factor alone. The truth is that there are many factors that distinguish one team from another, such as, whether they are attacking you, which direction they’re going, their armour type (an issue for VG i know), and their colours.

    So what this means is that if you were distinguishing friend from foe by colour only then you might find it difficult at the moment. Other then that it should be easy enough to tell friend from foe. Having said that its obvious that people are going to be able to be deceptive to a degree and they maybe attacked by friend or foe for their efforts.

    edit:
    pretty much as above quoted post….
    As much as you can be deceptive with the customisation it is also possible to make your team affiliation conspicuous - the agatha ‘quad’ pattern or the mason stripes for example



  • My issue is that I have problems with hues. I’m not colorblind, but the dark blue and black look similar to me… Or a light purple and a pink look similar. However, I don’t have an issue with the customization, in fact I love it lol. But like I said, I do have an issue with hues and sometimes TK because of it.


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