Tips for play for a casual.



  • When I first started playing this game I was pretty optomistic about and played it exclusively for a few weeks. I was able to perform every imaginable technique to some degree that are widely known. With that said, I haven’t improved at all past about 100 hours played. This is largely due to having after that point, playing other games and not playing chivalry for over a week straight at one point, as well as playing the game more casually and simply.

    At this point, I’m looking to play chivalry very casually and to adopt techniques/playstyle that is easy to remember and will carry on or be able to easily re-adopt after a brief leave from chivalry. For example if I start playing another game for a while and come back to chivalry later.

    Obviously these things are relative. For example, if someone plays Chivalry often, utilizing all techniques regardless of how advanced they may be considered, becomes easy. And so, I’m mainly looking for advice from people that have played the game a lot, but currently either play sparingly and/or very casually, while still being effective players. They may not be the most effective techniques or playstyle, but one that is easy to pickup and understand after a leave of play.

    If your lvl 40+ and don’t quite play the game as much as you used to but are still somewhat effective, your probably a good candidate, of course you don’t need to be lvl 40+, what advice do you have?



  • I dunno. I think your technique or playstyle depends on you, and how you want to enjoy yourself. I’m not really sure I can encapsulate an entire playstyle into something so easily digested that you can consult it upon your return to Chivalry. Maybe someone else can.

    Nothing changes the fact that if you take a leave from the game you come back a bit rusty. That’s applicable to most any game of this type.



  • @dudeface:

    I dunno. I think your technique or playstyle depends on you, and how you want to enjoy yourself. I’m not really sure I can encapsulate an entire playstyle into something so easily digested that you can consult it upon your return to Chivalry. Maybe someone else can.

    Nothing changes the fact that if you take a leave from the game you come back a bit rusty. That’s applicable to most any game of this type.

    Well I’d definitely agree it’s applicable to games of this type and pretty much any game for that matter. I’ll give you an example that is somewhat outside the scope of my question, but if someone gave me some recommendation similar I’d still appreciate it. In CS I’ll usually spend about 10 mins a day practicing on some AIM map, whether it has players in it or be a single player map like aiming_map.

    Obviously I’m not looking to spend 10 minutes a day practicing 6+ game that I “might” get back into. At that point it just becomes work. And in the specific case of CS, aiming applies in many aspects to all FPS to some degree.

    Some suggestion I’d expect some people to have would be ones that would also apply to brand new players, because they might be simply. But I do have at least a fundamental understand of every widely known technique in chivalry. And so a more experienced player turned casual/extended leave might have developed a method a simplifying a more advanced technique, this is another kind a suggestion I’d expect some people to have.

    I leave it kind of vague because how each individual does this will be different. What works for them might not work for me, on the other hand, it might work and I’d still like to hear it.



  • Learn to drag and bend your body. That will probably help you more even if it’s hard at first, but once you get used to it it’s rather quite easy to use your movement to get out of attacks, or if you see someone blocking you just turn upwards and your overhead might land because he blocked way to early, for example.



  • Pre-bubble patch I had about 400+ hours and was still learning. I did extremely well in T/Os and decent at duels against good competition. There was virtually no difference between people level 1-20. 35+ I started to see more skill and defense being used. 45+ were like the “Gods” of chivalry. Most (not all) really stood out as the elite.

    Now during the current live chivalry, I would say 100hrs is more than enough to compete with people of 500-1000hrs+. The skill ceiling is extremely low. Once you hit it, it is very little you can do to move past it. There is no more flanking, mminimum movement to block strikes (You barely have to move your mouse at all to block an overhead, horizontal strikes, or strikes aimed at the feet) and the bubble handles the footwork for everyone. There just isn’t much to master.

    The only thing you can do now is learn the timing of each weapon. If you play casually, this is something you probably don’t care about. I play off and on sparingly. Trying to learn deeper mechanics and gain skill is a thing of the past. Especially if you say you learned it in 100hrs. That says a lot about Chivalry’s current longevity.



  • If your lvl 40+ and don’t quite play the game as much as you used to but are still somewhat effective, your probably a good candidate, of course you don’t need to be lvl 40+, what advice do you have?

    Well that pretty much perfectly describes me (lvl 41) so I feel obligated to respond here.

    First advice is my control setup I use. For parry I set the keybinds to “I” and “right mouse”; for feint it’s “right mouse” and “Q”. What this does is allow the following:

    1. When doing nothing, right mouse click parries as normal.
    2. When attacking, Q feints to neutral so you can attack again.
    3. When attacking, right mouse simultaneously feints AND parries so you can cancel your attack instantly into a parry. This is extremely useful when you try to attack and immediately realize he attacked before you and you need to defend or get flinched.

    Second, try to recognize when an opponent would go on the defensive, and use that opportunity to feint attack. Usually after you parry, they will to parry you back, so a feint is a quick way to get that hit in. Also if they miss an attack and you try get a hit in, you should expect them to parry as well, so that’s a great time to feint.

    Finally, keep moving when fighting. Always try to find ways to place yourself where only one enemy can hit you. If you are getting surrounded, sometimes an unexpected duck or suddenly sprinting through everyone to the other side can save your life or make your enemies tk each other. In the best case, they will miss and damage each other so much that you can actually kill all of them.



  • Perfect your fundamentals. It’s not about fancy tricks or moves if you ask me. If you’re able to parry better, riposte better, aim better, have a better sense of timing / footwork than your opponent, you will win almost all the time. Fundamentals, it’s substance. Little tricks… well, they can make the difference in duels against very good players, but most of the time I don’t need to use anything more than a riposte or standard drag.



  • Find a decent well-adminned server!

    These tend to attract regular players and these regular players tend to be slightly higher calibre. If you’re lucky you might actually get a bit or teamwork and tactics even on a pubby server and if not the higher calibre of players will help improve your own game



  • Thanks for the responses guys, I think their is some good information here.

    @RushSecond:

    First advice is my control setup I use. For parry I set the keybinds to “I” and “right mouse”; for feint it’s “right mouse” and “Q”. What this does is allow the following:

    I’ll have to try this out, I wasn’t aware of this. I’ve played a handful of games with you before and from what I remember you always performed well so you must have a good method.

    @Damoiselle:

    Especially if you say you learned it in 100hrs. That says a lot about Chivalry’s current longevity.

    I wasn’t saying I mastered Chivalry or anything like that, not by a long shot. I was saying I was able to understand and perform every widely known technique to some degree after that time.

    Although having said that, it’s my belief that if someone played Chivalry only with the intention of practicing the game to master it, it could probably be done in about 150 hours. But what is the fun in that? Especially with such a small competitive community. Anyways, OFFTOPIC.



  • what i do is i search out the highest ranking player on any server, made easier now by the hats, and attack them. i see how they play and try to incorporate whatever i see them do or figure out how i can beat them next time i ecnounter them. yes, it leads to a lot of deaths on my part, but i have noticed that when i encounter a lower level, i am able to do a lot better than before. and it’s cool to beat a level40+.



  • Focus less on “advanced techniques” and focus more on manipulation.

    Example: Doing an attack pattern / movement pattern intentionally to bait an opponent, only to deviate from that pattern and capitalize on that… etc

    TL:DR – Mix things up, don’t be predictable, keep your opponent guessing.


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