How to get Texture Filtering and Anti Aliasing in Chivalry (with pictures)



  • Why the option settings in Chivalry do not offer settings for Anisotropic Filtering and Anti Aliasing is beyond me, but I’ll show you how to do it in the config files. Previously one of the programmers claimed you needed to run the DX11 version to get MSAA, which is actually false. First lets look at some comparison images.

    Anisotropic filtering is what makes the textures look better, anti aliasing resolves the jaggies.
    To enable this through the config files go to
    C:\Users\PC\Documents\My Games\Chivalry Medieval Warfare\UDKGame\Config
    Open UDKSystemSettings file with a text editor. press ctrl + F then search for MSAA. You will find a line with ‘bAllowD3D9MSAA=false’ set it to true. Then the line above it says ‘MaxMultiSamples=1’ you can set it to 2, 4, 6, or 8; higher = less jaggies. Then the line above that you’ll see ‘MaxAnisotropy=1’ you can set it to 2, 4, 8, or 16; higher = better textures.

    You may also be able to force these options through your driver settings.



  • Awesome, I’ll make sure to do this. I was actually more bothered by the lack of AF than the lack of AA. Mild jaggies I can handle, textures that appear blurry is awful.



  • This is kind of off topic, but what exactly causes aliasing to occur? I mean when I create 3d models there is no aliasing on them what so ever. So what causes the edges to become all jaggy? (I know “Hurr durr use Google”, but it ain’t the same)



  • @Flippy:

    This is kind of off topic, but what exactly causes aliasing to occur? I mean when I create 3d models there is no aliasing on them what so ever. So what causes the edges to become all jaggy? (I know “Hurr durr use Google”, but it ain’t the same)

    http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/anti-aliasing-nvidia-geforce-amd-radeon,review-32166.html

    in particular : “As always, with graphics, we must start with the pixel. Pixels are the little square dots that make up an image on a computer screen, the smallest addressable element. Aliasing is a by-product of using square dots to display an image. Consider a picture of a black diagonal line over a white background:”

    There is also pixel density, having a 1080p monitor which is 18-22" is a fairly high pixel density, so aliasing is less noticeable. If you have the same resolution on a 32" screen, aliasing is noticeable.



  • Thanks Gauntlet.


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