The Ark of the Covenant



  • Make a Team Objective map based on it?



  • Wait, what?



  • yea, ya know, where the german gets his face melted lol.

    Every war and all war is based on religion, belive it or not

    Ours is right, yours is wrong kinda mentallity.



  • First off, movie scenes can’t make it into the game! (that’s why we don’t have a Helms Deep map from AoC) And even if the scene was changed and recreated, C:MW is supposed to be in a realistic setting. Super powerful face-melting arcs are too unrealistic (however it could be an Easter egg, there is already a ghost)…



  • Well, your missing the point of the level/map design, its has nothing to do with hollywood. Just as an Objective in the game, since its from myth and lore of real life. And thats it.



  • I guess you could have a map where the objective would be obtaining a large golden ark, which has no magical/mystical/godly powers whatsoever.



  • @Viper:

    First off, movie scenes can’t make it into the game! (that’s why we don’t have a Helms Deep map from AoC) And even if the scene was changed and recreated, C:MW is supposed to be in a realistic setting. Super powerful face-melting arcs are too unrealistic (however it could be an Easter egg, there is already a ghost)…

    What’s unrealistic about waging wars for relics or holy places? Remember the crusades?



  • I’m only talking about working arks/relics.



  • This idea is being panned but its actually very valid.

    During the crusades, 9 Knights traveled to Jerusalem, under the guise of protecting the pilgrims.

    "There is no evidence that these founding Templars ever gave protection to pilgrims, but on the other hand, we were soon to find that there is conclusive proof that they did conduct extensive excavations under the ruins of Herod’s Temple [as Solomon’s temple was called after Herod rebuilt it].11

    The real task of the nine knights was to carry out research in the area, in order to obtain certain relics and manuscripts which contain the essence of the secret traditions of Judaism and ancient Egypt?12

    In The Hiram Key, Knight and Lomas conclude that the Templars excavated items of such importance at the site that they adopted a wholly new world view. Many other historians draw similar conclusions. The order’s founders and their successors were all of Christian upbringing, yet their philosophy of life was not a Christian one.

    At the end of the 19th century, Charles Wilson of the Royal Engineers, began conducting archeological research in Jerusalem. He concluded that the Templars had gone to Jerusalem to study the temple’s ruins and, from the evidence Wilson obtained there, that the Templars had set themselves up in the vicinity of the temple to facilitate excavation and research. The tools that the Templars left behind form part of the evidence Wilson gathered, and are now in the private collection of the Scottish Robert Brydon.13

    According to the authors of The Hiram Key, the Templars’ search was not in vain. They made a discovery that altered their perception of and outlook on the world entirely. Despite being born and raised in a Christian society, they adopted wholly un-Christian practices. Black magic rituals and rites and sermons of perverse content were common practice. There is a general consensus among historians that these practices were derived from on the Cabala."

    http://harunyahya.com/en/works/980/the- … apter/1813


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