So the million dollar question on clannie skills



  • My definition of a clannie has always been a high rank clan player who plays semi-professionally (1,000 hours per year) or a non-clan player with the same number of hours.

    I have always played casually but as time goes on and I get better I am starting to wonder what the difference is between the elite people (like Crushed) and the people who have played alot but still only above average skillz.

    So what is the breakdown?

    1. Computer

    Obviously high FPS, nice monitor gives you a certain edge in reacting to your environment

    1. Settings

    Ugh I will never go the fishbowl FOV despite the competitive players using it, just looks like shit. But ignore this for now as 3rd person is an option for non-competitive

    1. Ping

    Ignore this as not really relevant to overall skillz, just nice to have and nice for opponents not to lag

    1. Tracers

    This is the most interesting part as tracers can make a huge difference - learn how to hit the opponents foot is an obvious one to score a flinch.

    1. Timing

    Obviously this comes from experience but timing is critical - to attack someone during their recovery.

    1. Distance

    Very critical - if you can force a miss and a recovery so you strike obvious advantage.

    1. Movement

    Bend your body, use your footwork obviously makes a huge difference

    1. Parrying

    Well obvious skill

    Anyway the list could go on - I got bored - but what is it that makes up the perfect player

    AND MY BIG QUESTION - HOW MUCH DOES PROFESSIONAL TRAINING MAKE A DIFFERENCE



  • Well imo you can’t become a truly great player if you just pubstomp, because you don’t learn a lot from that. Pro players have to go old duel and read feints, dominate their opponents and such. For me that’s the main barrier between good high ranks and nub high ranks. (xylvion rekt once again)



  • @Rekrab:

    Well imo you can’t become a truly great player if you just pubstomp, because you don’t learn a lot from that. Pro players have to go old duel and read feints, dominate their opponents and such. For me that’s the main barrier between good high ranks and nub high ranks. (xylvion rekt once again)

    Could you say that in a less squeaky voice mate? I couldn’t really hear you. (besides I can read quite a lot of feints without dueling m7+1)
    Of course doing a lot of high tier duels will help you get better at parrying, reading feints and drags etc. In pub FFA there’s a higher chance for people dragging, feinting, or doing other weird moves than in pub TO for example. You also get to practice defending against 2-3 people with only half stamina and 5-10 hp. In pubs unlike duelyard you can’t force the hit trades, you’ll take damage, damage will make you lose hp which can kill you in the long run (obvious eh?). You can’t mindlessly spam lmb in team modes, you might hit team mates, in duel or ffa lmb is very very viable.



  • just play a lot against good opponents

    practice makes perfect



  • Honestly having high FPS and low ping are a critical part of doing well in this game. Sure it won’t make you good but without it you’ll likely never get very good. There are a few exceptions I’ve seen but not many, I know for me ping and FPS made a huge difference.



  • #1 is computer and ping. #2 is reaction time #3 is experience/smarts

    Some people just have faster reaction times - can make decisions faster. That’s the most important part after your setup. (Obviously you need some experience as well)



  • Wait did he say professional? BWAHAHHA
    NO such thing in Chiv. Professional is someone who actually gets paid to play Chiv regardless of hours. There are no professional players under the true definition. But 1000 hours per year is a lot. Granted so many quit after a few hundred hours.



  • @Mystikkal:

    #1 is computer and ping. #2 is reaction time #3 is experience/smarts

    Some people just have faster reaction times - can make decisions faster. That’s the most important part after your setup. (Obviously you need some experience as well)

    Yup. It seems like professional gamers can switch games of even different genres and quickly move up to professional levels. Practice and good hardware will get you far, but growing up in an environment where you hardwired your brain for gaming is going to put you above the competition quickly.


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