How can TBS…



  • i love tim tams



  • I love the direction this thread is going.



  • game is great, you are mad at the game because you love it so much



  • @Tibberius:

    Dragging is of course intended, here is a video from over 5 years ago indicating this - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiMlA8n3k58 .

    Some of the advanced moves weren’t expected but they are also very exciting extensions of the system. Its up to us in future iterations to make these moves look reasonable while still allowing for the extreme player control and creativity that people love in Chivalry.

    That looked great, to me. My main problem with Chivalry as it stands is that you can’t “drag” freely enough. Once you start a swing, your viewpoint goes into quicksand mode, and you’re only able to make small adjustments in direction. It makes the game feel clunky and unresponsive to me. In that video, it looks like your viewpoint was completely unrestricted, which would’ve been awesome.

    I don’t really get what you meant by saying other melee games having “rigid strikes” - I’ve never encountered that myself, other than in Chivalry. All the other melee games I’ve played, like Rune, Mount & Blade or even Die by the sword (all of which predate Chivalry), had unrestricted strikes.



  • There was a time witha way higher dragcap so it felt like none existed, that was awful. But I agree that some weapons should have it slightly increased, such as the knights axes/Gmace and morningstar/falchion.



  • yeah its too slow atm



  • @Nomadicstorm:

    That looked great, to me. My main problem with Chivalry as it stands is that you can’t “drag” freely enough. Once you start a swing, your viewpoint goes into quicksand mode, and you’re only able to make small adjustments in direction. It makes the game feel clunky and unresponsive to me. In that video, it looks like your viewpoint was completely unrestricted, which would’ve been awesome.

    I don’t really get what you meant by saying other melee games having “rigid strikes” - I’ve never encountered that myself, other than in Chivalry. All the other melee games I’ve played, like Rune, Mount & Blade or even Die by the sword (all of which predate Chivalry), had unrestricted strikes.

    Allow me to correct you. For one that old video is of Age of Chivalry and the beta came out is 2004 I believe. A long time ago and was one of the first of it’s kind also in a different game engine. Chivalry is the direct decedent and the swings turn speed was reduced to avoid 360+ helicopter attacks that plagued AOC early on. What makes some weapon drags seem muddy has more to do with the length of the weapon as well as the animations. Some weapons like the messer can almost stop in mid swing for what seems way too long. I could agree that many times my drag stab is stopped and it frustrates the shit out of me. The bug that they claimed was fixed really isnt.



  • 720 LMBs FTW.



  • I’m not sure if I’ll be able to reproduce it anymore, but about 1 year + ago I was able to do 720 stabs. Today I’ve learned how to walk while reloading, or walk while doing the “stand still” warcry. I’ll dedicate tomorrow to try and perform superdodges again, yay.



  • I haven’t played this game in a long time now. Got sick of all the bullshit reverse overheads type meta, poor netcode, bugs, balance issues, silence from TB on the matters and eventually just uninstalled it.

    Instead I took up real sword fighting HEMA style, fuck your reverse overheads do that shit and I’ll stab you in the back of the head, if you even get that far.

    Oh, and playing CSGO.



  • I just miss being able to fight a bunch of people at once way back when. Then sprint interrupt happened. I guess it was more than that too. It was just one patch that greatly lowered the skill ceiling and I lost that feeling of “I can still get better at this game.”

    CS:GO has the same problem compared to the previous iterations of CS.



  • You’re talking about the “June Patch”.
    Never speak of that again. It is too painful!



  • @BillDoor:

    You’re talking about the “June Patch”.
    Never speak of that again. It is too painful!

    I started playing the day after that patch came out =/



  • @Sir:

    I started playing the day after that patch came out =/

    You never experienced the true glory of amazingly fun (but imbalanced) gameplay.

    Ahh… the staminas. The CFTPs. The winning of 1v5s.



  • ya you wouldnt stam out after parrying thrice in pre-june patch and you could footwork to avoid all the noobs



  • @Retsnom:

    Allow me to correct you. For one that old video is of Age of Chivalry and the beta came out is 2004 I believe. A long time ago and was one of the first of it’s kind also in a different game engine. Chivalry is the direct decedent and the swings turn speed was reduced to avoid 360+ helicopter attacks that plagued AOC early on. What makes some weapon drags seem muddy has more to do with the length of the weapon as well as the animations. Some weapons like the messer can almost stop in mid swing for what seems way too long. I could agree that many times my drag stab is stopped and it frustrates the shit out of me. The bug that they claimed was fixed really isnt.

    I’m not entirely sure what you’re correcting. The “restricted dragging” or whatever it’s called isn’t due to an engine limitation, but rather a design choice, as you say. I personally don’t agree with that design choice, since I feel it makes the game feel clunky to me. I get that it restricts the 360 degree strikes and whatnot, but I see two problems with that.

    One is that restricting your viewpoint movement isn’t the only, or necessarily the best, way to deal with the issue. Look at M&B, for instance, where it’s regulated by weapon speed instead. Now, M&B feels clunky to me for a whole different set of reasons - but this isn’t one of them.

    The other problem is that I personally don’t necessarily think the possibility to make 360 degree strikes is a “plague”. If you want to disorient yourself in order to make a panic-move, then go ahead. Odds are it’ll just get you killed anyway. I’ve seen it work well in games before - Rune, that I mentioned earlier, is an example of that. 360 degree swings were entirely possible (and an accepted game mechanic) there, but it didn’t harm the gameplay. Here is a player-perspective video showcasing Rune combat. There are a couple of random 360 degree swings made every now and then, but it’s hardly the norm, and the random panic-swings often tend to get you killed.

    What the unrestricted viewpoint does is that it allows players to adjust their direction in relation to their weapon swings, so that you always have the edge pointed at the enemy (and therefore also always have your range maximized). If you’re looking for a mechanic that supports the “easy to learn, hard to master” ideal, then that’s a great one. You can quickly become passable by roughly learning when your weapon is at its apex and managing your range with your timing, but you can keep on working forever on perfecting your direction adjustments without ever getting all the way there, but rather a little better each time.

    That, and your game won’t feel like quicksand.

    I get that not everyone will agree with me, and that’s fine - it is entirely legitimate to dislike the twitchy gameplay that “unrestricted dragging” generates, but I don’t. And since I dislike the quicksand-view so much, but also like the rest of Chivalry, the current state just makes me personally a little disappointed.



  • Rune also doesn’t seem to have release tracers that can be manipulated.



  • @Nomadicstorm:

    I’m not entirely sure what you’re correcting. The “restricted dragging” or whatever it’s called isn’t due to an engine limitation, but rather a design choice, as you say. I personally don’t agree with that design choice, since I feel it makes the game feel clunky to me. I get that it restricts the 360 degree strikes and whatnot, but I see two problems with that.

    One is that restricting your viewpoint movement isn’t the only, or necessarily the best, way to deal with the issue. Look at M&B, for instance, where it’s regulated by weapon speed instead. Now, M&B feels clunky to me for a whole different set of reasons - but this isn’t one of them.

    The other problem is that I personally don’t necessarily think the possibility to make 360 degree strikes is a “plague”. If you want to disorient yourself in order to make a panic-move, then go ahead. Odds are it’ll just get you killed anyway. I’ve seen it work well in games before - Rune, that I mentioned earlier, is an example of that. 360 degree swings were entirely possible (and an accepted game mechanic) there, but it didn’t harm the gameplay. Here is a player-perspective video showcasing Rune combat. There are a couple of random 360 degree swings made every now and then, but it’s hardly the norm, and the random panic-swings often tend to get you killed.

    What the unrestricted viewpoint does is that it allows players to adjust their direction in relation to their weapon swings, so that you always have the edge pointed at the enemy (and therefore also always have your range maximized). If you’re looking for a mechanic that supports the “easy to learn, hard to master” ideal, then that’s a great one. You can quickly become passable by roughly learning when your weapon is at its apex and managing your range with your timing, but you can keep on working forever on perfecting your direction adjustments without ever getting all the way there, but rather a little better each time.

    That, and your game won’t feel like quicksand.

    I get that not everyone will agree with me, and that’s fine - it is entirely legitimate to dislike the twitchy gameplay that “unrestricted dragging” generates, but I don’t. And since I dislike the quicksand-view so much, but also like the rest of Chivalry, the current state just makes me personally a little disappointed.

    HA! Now I understand what you are referring too. It is not a restricted view really. What I think you are having problems with is how the game view is designed. In most FPS games, you can move your head independently from your torso or the direction in which you run. So you can run straight but look to your left, right, up or down. Chiv really doesnt work this way on purpose because of the real time swing control which most melee games do no have. Most have preprogramed strikes and really cannot control the strikes like you can in Chiv. You have to use foot work instead of actual real swing control. AOC/Chiv was the first to come up with their swing strike method and many others have copied it.

    The view inst restricted cause it is tied in with the torso so that you have no neck so to speak. What is restricted is the turn speed of the torso when attacking. So not having a neck and the ability to turn your head independently of your torso is really your problem and why it feels clunky too you. I too used to feel the same way when Chiv came out. If you watch the enemy heads, the will follow you BUT that person is only looking the direction of the torso.

    Sadly you didnt play AOC and see the evolution of this game. If you did then you would clearly understand why the mechanics are the way they are. The 360 attack that plagued the AOC and part of Chiv was the not just a 360 but a spinning helicopter attack that would go as fast as you could turn your mouse. You can see this if you just spin as fast as you can then imagine attacking at the same time. Yeah that would be retarded.

    Most of the swing attacks already have 300 degree attack radius so learn to use the swing trace from the beginning till the end. You can see this swing trace by typing: aoc_drawtracer 1 in console and you will see your swing traces. this will allow you to get an idea of how far behind you your attack really starts and finishes. The trick it to learn to use the entire swing to your advantage. I think this new perspective will assist you in understanding the mechanics better.



  • In most FPS games? Most FPS games don’t allow you to turn your head independantly from your body lol. Only two I know of are Arma and operation flashpoint.

    Can’t in call of duty, battlefield, counter strike, Team fortress 2, red orchestra, insurgency…



  • @lemonater47:

    In most FPS games? Most FPS games don’t allow you to turn your head independantly from your body lol. Only two I know of are Arma and operation flashpoint.

    Can’t in call of duty, battlefield, counter strike, Team fortress 2, red orchestra, insurgency…

    Do you even read? It is not just head but to be able to look one direction while moving or doing something in another different direction. Chivalry’s can is set to the torso period and while you can move in all directions, looking and acting in another direction is greatly limited. I think he was confusing what is typical for many game and not finding the same response in Chiv. I find M&B horrific in the fight mechanics and camera views compared to chiv


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