Quack's guide to not being a noob.



  • Wall of text incoming:

    BASICS:
    -Practice, practice, practice!

    -The best fighting style is to not have a style. Having a “style” means that opponents will come to expect certain attacks/techniques from you, and learn how to counter them. Keeping your attack pattern random and agressive will throw you opponent off balance. You can even trick your opponents by making them think you play a certain way, then suddenly change tactics for complete surprise.

    -Keep your opponent in sight. Unless performing an advanced technique (such as a reverse overhead), never turn your back to an enemy you are fighting, or let them slip around your side. For example: If a Man-at-arms side-dodges out of your vision, immediately center on him again.

    -React to what is happening, not what you think will happen. Don’t block if you don’t see your opponent’s arms move, I.E. panic parry. Maintain a steely resolve against panic blocking.

    -Attacks hit sooner if your foe is closer. This makes face-to-face combat very dangerous indeed.

    -Don’t block too early! Wait till the last possible moment to block an attack, to be sure it isn’t a drag/ feint.

    • Reverse overheads, however, must be blocked almost as soon as they begin. ONLY block early if you think its a reverse overhead, learning the difference takes practice.

    -Footwork is important. Try to get around an opponent’s side, out of their field of vision. Also, you can try to force a miss by backstepping out of range, then lunge in for an attack.

    -Weapon speed/ range must be learned. Attacking too late/ out of range can spell disaster.

    -Fight using different classes/ weapon types. Complacencey leads to defeat, and practicing with an unfamiliar weapon will make you better.

    TRICKSY TRICKS:

    -Feints. Learn to read feints (see below). Use them as well, but not in any predictable way. If you feint too much/ in a pattern, your opponent will predict it and put you at a disadvantage. Also keep in mind that feints cost a LOT of stamina.

    -Feint using the fastest attack. For example, use the quick spear slash to trick your opponent, then use a stab after he blocks. If you feint using a slower attack, your opponent will have a better chance of reading the feint.

    -Grunt = not a feint. When fighting a slower weapon, wait to hear an opponent’s grunt before blocking, to be sure it’s not a feint. This is not easy or even possible with fast weapons however. Reading feints is easier if your opponent is further away.
    NOTE: It’s not always possible to wait for the grunt depending on weapon speed/ distance. Learn how to recognize the signs for when your opponent is about to feint. For example, if he is trying normal attacks against you repeatedly with no success, there’s a good chance he will try to feint. Learn which specific opponents use feints the most as well.

    -Drags. When swinging with a weapon you can move your mouse to speed up/ slow down an attack, to trick your oppoenent into blocking too late/ too early. This is especially good with long slash-y weapons, like the messer. This is even possible with stabbing weapons, I.E. spears.

    -Reverse overheads. It is possible to hit almost instantly by turning your back and doing an overhead attack. This works well for some weapons (maul/ polearms) and not at all for others (spears/daggers). Keep in mind that if you miss/ your opponent blocks this attack, your back will be turned to your opponent’s counterattack.

    -Combo-feint-to-parry. This one takes fast reflexes and lots of practice. If you swing and miss an attack, immediately feint to be able to block your opponent’s counterattack. This is used as damage control, to prevent your opponent from getting an easy hit off of your miss.

    -Z-stab. When stabbing, drag your stab left and right to trick your opponent into blocking on the wrong side.

    IN A 1v1:
    -Be agressive! If you can’t attack 1st, then immediately try to shift the balance by counterattacking. Letting your opponent attack repeatedly can spell disaster unless you really know what you are doing.

    -If you lose initiative, regain it ASAP by counterattacking/ blocking/ evading.

    -Riposte! Immediately after you block, do a quick counterattack to regain initiative. This is especially good with fast weapons.

    -Don’t rely on riposte too much! If you always riposte, you will become predictable.

    -Don’t fall into a pattern. Patterns can be predicted, so change your attacks/ footwork up. Again, don’t fall into a pattern of block-riposte. Delay your attacks sometimes to throw your opponent off balance.

    -Just because your opponent is wounded and bloody doesn’t mean he’s finished. See the end of this fight for an example. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27M5KWI_q50

    IN A TEAM FIGHT:
    -Strength is in numbers, stick together! If you spawn in alone, wait for some teammates to spawn with you, or even wait until you have the whole team in a group.

    -Don’t mob up on a single opponent, as this results in team damage. Try to surround him, but don’t all rush him at once.

    -Switch targets. If you suddenly start attacking a different opponent, you can get an easy kill. You can even block one oppoenent’s attack, then riposte-attack a different opponent for maximum pwnage.

    -Left mousing near teammates is a bad idea, unless you are very good. Use stab/ overhead.

    -If outnumbered, you’re probably boned unless there’s a big skill gap. Be very agressive. Don’t give them time to surround you, also switching targets is absolutely vital in this situation. Try not to be in range of more than 1 or 2 opponent at a time.

    -If you are an archer, the enemy archers are your priority. This is especially true with crossbowmen.



  • All good advice. I especially agree with changing weapons/classes often. It’s the best way to learn opponents capabilities.
    Often forgotten is the crouch. When healing, I stay moving in a crouch because there may be a hidden archer out there. And although I don’t always pull it off, ducking under a swing kinda earns respect…and fear.
    In team battles, know your opponents. By looking at the standings screen, you can see if that Knight is a level 12 or 42. Good to know before you engage at half health.



  • @quackquackquack:

    BASICS:
    -The best fighting style is to not have a style. Having a “style” means that opponents will come to expect certain attacks/techniques from you, and learn how to counter them. Keeping your attack pattern random and agressive will throw you opponent off balance. You can even trick your opponents by making them think you play a certain way, then suddenly change tactics for complete surprise.

    I know this might not be the meaning, and to a certain degree I agree, but nontheless this screams gamble into my face and I don`t like that. :P

    @quackquackquack:

    • Reverse overheads, however, must be blocked almost as soon as they begin. ONLY block early if you think its a reverse overhead, learning the difference takes practice.
      Until polearms happen. Or to a lesser degree Messer /Zweihander. Animations start inside you and you obviously go for the block. But as it is just the windup, you are gonne get hit… Hate that.

    Rest is pretty solid advice. Good work. I think people can take this to good use when they start the game.
    I most definitely agree on this one here by the way: @quackquackquack:

    Practice, practice, practice!



  • @quackquackquack:

    -Feints. Learn to read feints (see below). Use them as well, but not in any predictable way. If you feint too much/ in a pattern, your opponent will predict it and put you at a disadvantage. Also keep in mind that feints cost a LOT of stamina.

    -Feint using the fastest attack. For example, use the quick spear slash to trick your opponent, then use a stab after he blocks. If you feint using a slower attack, your opponent will have a better chance of reading the feint.

    I’m not a fan of telling new players to feint for two reasons:

    1. Since it is super easy, they’ll crutch on feints and won’t learn any other ways to hit people. Every other offensive move is both harder to perform and has lower success rate, so they’ll see no point in learning them.

    2. Pub people, majority of whom don’t feint, will feint them back. The next encounter of a feinting noob and once feinted high rank usually looks like this: feint->hit->combo feint->hit->combo feint->hit, death.



  • @petergriffin:

    2. Pub people, majority of whom don’t feint, will feint them back. The next encounter of a feinting noob and once feinted high rank usually looks like this: feint->hit->combo feint->hit->combo feint->hit, death.

    Very this. Followed by a “learn to play before you learn to feint” for maximum saltiness.



  • Blast! I forgot to add in stuff about crouching. Fair enough about the feints, although I only started feinting at 1000+ hours. Some players definitely do crutch on it, and those players are usually not able to read feints at all.