Strange thing I've found with mouse movement



  • When you swing, you can turn 180 degrees no problem if you push your mouse fast but at a constant rate.

    However, if you move your mouse really fast like twitching, the game restricts swing movement and you barely turn 60 degrees.

    This seems like a negative mouse acceleration issue more than screen restriction. Anyone know how to change this?



  • I’ve noticed this too, actually. It’s very, very annoying.



  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AWior12DnM

    @ OP

    Is it something similar looking to this? It’s more of a thing you can feel instead of see. But the first three swings are with a mouse and I’m trying to move left and right fast while swinging and movement feels so restricted. The next set of 3 swings are with a controller and my movement doesn’t feel restricted. I can move left to right freely when swinging with a controller, but not a mouse.



  • It’s intentional. The game doesn’t simply decrease your mouse sensitivity when you swing, because that would simply give a huge advantage to players with a mouse that can swap DPI on the fly with a thumb button - lower DPI for normal play, switch it to higher when you swing so you can spin around like a ballerina. Instead it limits the distance you can turn your screen every… whatever unit of measurement they’re using to restrict it. Seconds, frames, game ticks, swing traces, whatever. So yes, if you just twitch your mouse you won’t be able to make a sharp aim adjustment, you’re better off gradually adjusting it - or better yet, anticipating and aiming your swing before you start swinging.

    I think it works pretty well, personally. Once you adjust to it and realize this is a melee game where you’re supposed to feel the weight of your swings rather than twitch around making 360 NOSCOPE HEADSHOTS, it’s a lot more immersive. Missing swings wouldn’t really be possible without it. As a side note: I defy you to go find a long broom and thrust it forward with your full body weight while spinning 180 degrees on your heels without falling on your ass and/or face. :P



  • @SlyGoat:

    It’s intentional. The game doesn’t simply decrease your mouse sensitivity when you swing, because that would simply give a huge advantage to players with a mouse that can swap DPI on the fly with a thumb button - lower DPI for normal play, switch it to higher when you swing so you can spin around like a ballerina. Instead it limits the distance you can turn your screen every… whatever unit of measurement they’re using to restrict it. Seconds, frames, game ticks, swing traces, whatever. So yes, if you just twitch your mouse you won’t be able to make a sharp aim adjustment, you’re better off gradually adjusting it - or better yet, anticipating and aiming your swing before you start swinging.

    I think it works pretty well, personally. Once you adjust to it and realize this is a melee game where you’re supposed to feel the weight of your swings rather than twitch around making 360 NOSCOPE HEADSHOTS, it’s a lot more immersive. Missing swings wouldn’t really be possible without it. As a side note: I defy you to go find a long broom and thrust it forward with your full body weight while spinning 180 degrees on your heels without falling on your ass and/or face. :P

    That makes sense, but why is this feature not present when using a controller?



  • @venomblade:

    @SlyGoat:

    It’s intentional. The game doesn’t simply decrease your mouse sensitivity when you swing, because that would simply give a huge advantage to players with a mouse that can swap DPI on the fly with a thumb button - lower DPI for normal play, switch it to higher when you swing so you can spin around like a ballerina. Instead it limits the distance you can turn your screen every… whatever unit of measurement they’re using to restrict it. Seconds, frames, game ticks, swing traces, whatever. So yes, if you just twitch your mouse you won’t be able to make a sharp aim adjustment, you’re better off gradually adjusting it - or better yet, anticipating and aiming your swing before you start swinging.

    I think it works pretty well, personally. Once you adjust to it and realize this is a melee game where you’re supposed to feel the weight of your swings rather than twitch around making 360 NOSCOPE HEADSHOTS, it’s a lot more immersive. Missing swings wouldn’t really be possible without it. As a side note: I defy you to go find a long broom and thrust it forward with your full body weight while spinning 180 degrees on your heels without falling on your ass and/or face. :P

    That makes sense, but why is this feature not present when using a controller?

    I’m not sure, I’ve never used a controller in Chiv. I’ve noticed it seems to be diminished in 3rd person as well, though that could be a matter of perspective.



  • I’m not talking about 360 degree turns that would make enemies confused and frustrated. I’m talking about how you get less turn if you move your mouse faster. I can turn 180 no problem and I exploit this all the time in the game; run away, prepare stab, turn 180 degrees back.

    Countless times I missed an opponent with overhead because I have twitchy mouse movement. You get like 10 degrees of movement if you move your mouse too fast.

    Why doesn’t the game allow twitchy aim to be restricted to wider angle, say 60 degrees or 90 degrees?



  • Because you can’t “twitch your aim” while you’re swinging. You would be hindered by the momentum of the swing and probably just fall on your ass. Chivalry was built with the mentality that the reason melee sucks in FPS games is because FPS games treat melee the same as it does shooting, so Chivalry does things differently, including this restriction of your ability to “twitch”.



  • One of the devs posted that during actions, like swinging your sword, the mouse turn rate is fixed to some small value. Which means that the amount you can turn only depends on how long you were dragging the mouse and not how fast. So, it makes sense to turn the mouse at a certain constant and small rate to get the most degrees of turning. If you try to flick the mouse, you simply run out of movement space/mousepad space quickly, and you end up stopping to turn too soon.

    This limitation was implemented because the game tracks your weapon in real time to determine collisions and hits on the enemy player, and without such limitation, a player could just flick the mouse really fast and abuse the system, maybe even get multiple hits on the same player with just one swing.



  • I’ve played dozens of hours and I still can’t get used to it, unfortunately.



  • @Zealot:

    I’ve played dozens of hours and I still can’t get used to it, unfortunately.

    I think fluid motion is the key to success here.



  • @venomblade:

    That makes sense, but why is this feature not present when using a controller?

    The controller’s natural slow speed is automatically under the speed limit of the weapon swing. It can’t do the things a mouse can do.

    As a side note, you can actually turn your mouse 360 degrees over and over again in an instant as long as you don’t swing your weapon. This lets you pick your targets and defend from any angle, but the swing animation won’t be permitted to spin in 360s repeatedly while standing in place.



  • @SlyGoat:

    Because you can’t “twitch your aim” while you’re swinging. You would be hindered by the momentum of the swing and probably just fall on your ass. Chivalry was built with the mentality that the reason melee sucks in FPS games is because FPS games treat melee the same as it does shooting, so Chivalry does things differently, including this restriction of your ability to “twitch”.

    I guess.

    @acrh2:

    the amount you can turn only depends on how long you were dragging the mouse and not how fast.

    This explains it I guess.


  • Developer

    It’s that exactly. During a swing the game limits how many degrees you can turn per second, which means that no matter how much you whip your mouse, you’re going to hit the same ceiling. You have to keep dragging it to go anywhere.



  • @CrustaceanSoup:

    It’s that exactly. During a swing the game limits how many degrees you can turn per second, which means that no matter how much you whip your mouse, you’re going to hit the same ceiling. You have to keep dragging it to go anywhere.

    Ah! it’s degrees per second! Ok. Thank you for the explanation. I don’t know how I didn’t think of that. Playing Chivalry for 5 days straight kind of numbed my brain.



  • Enter the high FOV. It seems to me that the turn cap is based on the screen position. So moving the mouse left 1cm will move the screen 10 ‘units’, for example. Instead of the turn cap being based on the direction the player is facing, so move mouse left 1cm will move the player x+y+z postion to left 10 units. With higher FOV’s like 140, it takes only a small movement of the mouse to move the equivalent of a 105fov player’s screen, where as the 105fov player has to move the mouse further (at the capped rate) for the same effect.

    If it based on player view position, then higher FOV’s still requie less moues movement to reach and sustain the cap then lower FOV’s?

    This is how it seems, as playing with FOV dragging is significantly easier or more effective. You an stab left/right/left/right in release whilst with 105 fov you can’t seem to get the full range of movement in the same amount of desk space.



  • Each weapon is also different.
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AkCaqK9JaJDIdEo3NDJKWkk5SVhRY2tEYjBLSk1xbWc&usp=drive_web#gid=126 - Here is a spreadsheet with all the rotation cap speeds in the game, note that the horizontal one also applies for weapon parries.



  • While everyone has done a great job in explaining. I will add to this. There is a ratio between FOV, mouse sensitivity and mouse DPI, depending on the quality and settings of the mouse. Finding that perfect balance of all three to get your spin attacks flowing smoothly and accurately does take time and testing. Again, there is no one size fits all solution since FOV has not been restricted in any way.

    I always thought that allowing a wide FOV range is a huge mistake and makes for a very unlevel playing field while at the same time make the game look like shit all distorted. Players shouldn’t have to get used to a distorted view just to get more kills. But that is just me.

    Now back to the a game stick not having this issue. If you look at the key binds you will see two binds Look Left, Look Right. These will turn your screen at a constant rate when pressed. This is how game pads work. So when you press a direction is it the same as pressing a button to turn except that it also has a pressure sensor so that it will accelerate faster the more you press. Just google keyboard vs analog stick or game pads. But the idea here is that you can press “Turn Left” button and mouse at the same time for a slight turn boost. But the config is tough to get used to since you are using both hands to turn.

    Now on to the problem of 3rd person being faster than first. It is really simple if you think about it. You are further away from the center of action thus it has a natural speed amplification in 3rd person. It is like using zoom on a pic, on a smart phone, the closer you are and you move your finger across the screen the less of a picture moves but if you are zoomed out and you swipe your finger the whole picture moves.

    That is why 3rd person players have another advantage over 1st person players. Less mouse movement, more range of motion.



  • This thread was started in 2012 :D



  • @Tyoson:

    This thread was started in 2012 :D

    HAHA totally missed the necro….


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