Why is this game called Chivalry: Medieval Warfare?



  • I mean I know it comes from Age of Chivalry, but even then, was there any horses? I’m not complaining, I’m just curious. Where is the actual Chivalry? Or I’m missing something about the real meaning of Chivalry?



  • Good troll almost got me until the last part 8/10



  • Because Modern Warfare



  • chiv·al·ry [shiv-uh?l-ree]
    noun, plural chiv·al·ries for 6.
    1.
    the sum of the ideal qualifications of a knight, including courtesy, generosity, valor, and dexterity in arms.
    2.
    the rules and customs of medieval knighthood.
    3.
    the medieval system or institution of knighthood.
    4.
    a group of knights.
    5.
    gallant warriors or gentlemen

    cav·al·ry [kav-uh?l-ree]
    noun, plural cav·al·ries.
    1.
    Military .
    a.
    the part of a military force composed of troops that serve on horseback.
    b.
    mounted soldiers collectively.
    c.
    the motorized, armored units of a military force organized for maximum mobility.
    2.
    horsemen, horses, etc., collectively.



  • @SlyGoat:

    chiv·al·ry [shiv-uh?l-ree]
    noun, plural chiv·al·ries for 6.
    1.
    the sum of the ideal qualifications of a knight, including courtesy, generosity, valor, and dexterity in arms.
    2.
    the rules and customs of medieval knighthood.
    3.
    the medieval system or institution of knighthood.
    4.
    a group of knights.
    5.
    gallant warriors or gentlemen

    cav·al·ry [kav-uh?l-ree]
    noun, plural cav·al·ries.
    1.
    Military .
    a.
    the part of a military force composed of troops that serve on horseback.
    b.
    mounted soldiers collectively.
    c.
    the motorized, armored units of a military force organized for maximum mobility.
    2.
    horsemen, horses, etc., collectively.

    Oh thanks! You’re right, I confused the words. Sorry English it’s not my primary language so yeah, that’s my excuse :P



  • Lmao. Cheval-ry. It’s French.



  • Most of the horses were eaten. What remained was rendered into glue and used to fletch the archers’ arrows.



  • Just because two words are different doesn’t mean they aren’t closely related. The french word for horse is cheval and the french word for chivalry is chevalerie. The words are quite clearly related. The word chevaler means knight, and it comes from the latin word caballarius meaning horseman. The vast, vast, VAST majority of knights would have fought from atop a horse, and so the word knight (and by extension the words chivalry, chivalrous etc. since they are “knightly” qualities) is usually used to describe a horseman.



  • And knights are in-game so it’s all fine!
    :D



  • What are you talking about? This game is ONLY called Chivalry… CHIVALRY!!! :P



  • Chivalry what? I thought this was Call of Duty: Medieval Warfare… :|



  • They should have just called this game Chivalry. Medieval warfare sounds fucking stupid



  • “Chivalry” comes from the french word “Chevalerie”, and “cheval” in french means “horse”.
    So yeah, it’s not a very accurate name, but whatever.



  • Perhaps I’m missing something but SlyGoat’s post seems to address the issue rather well?



  • It really doesn’t.



  • @The:

    “Chivalry” comes from the french word “Chevalerie”, and “cheval” in french means “horse”.
    So yeah, it’s not a very accurate name, but whatever.

    “Chivalry” is an English word meaning exactly what I posted earlier.

    If you want to trace every word in the English language back to its roots, nothing makes sense.



  • There are very few words that can be considered fully “English”, and chivalry is not one of them. The origin of a word is very important when you’re discussing the actual definition of the word.

    Regardless of etymology, chivalry is a word almost exclusively associated with knights; armoured men who rode horses.



  • @grappo:

    There are very few words that can be considered fully “English”, and chivalry is not one of them. The origin of a word is very important when you’re discussing the actual definition of the word.

    Regardless of etymology, chivalry is a word almost exclusively associated with knights; armoured men who rode horses.

    I would argue the dictionary is more important when you’re discussing the actual definition of the word.



  • Hes confused with cavalry :o
    The horsemen…



  • @SlyGoat:

    @grappo:

    There are very few words that can be considered fully “English”, and chivalry is not one of them. The origin of a word is very important when you’re discussing the actual definition of the word.

    Regardless of etymology, chivalry is a word almost exclusively associated with knights; armoured men who rode horses.

    I would argue the dictionary is more important when you’re discussing the actual definition of the word.

    Dictionaries only give you a general definition. If you’re looking for a full one, you actually have to research stuff.


Log in to reply